About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
MSNBCW 7
CNBC 3
MSNBC 3
CNNW 1
CSPAN2 1
FBC 1
KOFY 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 23
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
. joining me now is democratic strategist margie omero and victoria defrancesco soto, a fellow at the university of texas and an msnbc contributor. thank you both for joining me tonight. >> thanks, rev. >> victoria, how does the president keep the momentum from his re-election going into the second term? >> he keeps the momentum going by focusing on the big picture and in particular the big global picture. so we know that in 2012 and 2008 he got elected to foresee change. and in particular change from the bush era policies of involvement in the middle east. we saw that that he's building his dream team. bringing on hagel and kerry to make good on that promise that he put forward in 2008 to scale down the u.s. involvement. the american public wants it, and he's going to deliver in the second term. >> margie, what is interesting about the two appointments that victoria just mentioned, hagel and brennan are both people the president has worked with. he seems to trust the allies. not the same in the lincoln term of rivals. these are not rivals. these people are close to the preside
washington post." >> thank you, reverend. >>> margie, do republicans think they can learn to sweet talk women and minorities to win their support? >> they certainly have a lot of ground to make up. they tried this strategy there, talk about rape a lot, it was clearly unsuccessful. he had huge losses with men-only voters. really bring some women to the table. there are a lot of great, ways. we can be for taxes, we can be for less spending and at the same time, not sound hostile to women and minority voters vj. >> dana, when you look at the exit polling from november's election, republicans lost african americans by 87 points. lost hispanics by 44 points. if you were in williamsburg, how would you turn this around? >> here's what i wouldn't have done, reverend al. they had this session on reaching out to minorities and they held it in a room named for slave plantation which the only thing better than that would be if they have the breakout sessions after that and all retired to lunch in the bull connor ballroom. it is the whole concept is if they'll just change the message a little bit. it's no
's stepping up to rush and fox. joining me now is joe madison and margie omara. thank you both for joining me tonight. >> thank you, reverend sharpton. joe, let me start with you. this is clearly a calculated move by the president. can he stop some of the right wing vile that is coming he has way? >> well, of course he can. because, again, he has the pulpit of the white house. but, you know, rushl lim burks augh said the reason we stand out like a sor erksz thumb is because of abc. no, the reason they stand out at fox and limbaugh stands out is what limbauh said about women in combat. he said they have a fighting force. that's why they stand out. the reason they stand out is because sarah palin thinks that the kodiak island is the largest island in north america, forget about hawaii. the listen they stand out is because she thinks north korea was an ally of the united states. and so the president has started to do what a lot of us have done and he understands that the voice of the republican party that he defeated was rush limbaugh and fox news and everybody knows it. >> well, margie, when yo
in democratic strategist margie omaro and deputy press secretary tony fratto. marg margie, should the president go s solo? >> it's certainly consistent with what the american people want. the american people, both in the polls and at the polls, have said that they want progress and movement, not more bickering and gridlock. when you see some of these quotes, chris, from republicans saying, we need a government shutdown out of our system, we need to show voters we're ready to fight and we're fighting. voters don't want more fighting. >> south carolina congresswoman clyburn who is number three democrat in the house said the president should take matters into his own hands if he has to. here's what he says. >> if the president, as the chief executive officer of the country, is faced with this kind of a -- on the part of a few members in the house of representatives, i think he will do well for himself and for the country to sign an executive order invoking the 14th amendment. >> we heard republicans, tony, talking about we just heard marsha blackburn not ruling out a government shutdown. >> yeah.
pac, it could be a force to be reckoned with. >> and i also wonder, margie, if this super pac does very well, very early, gets a lot of money, maybe other super pacs form, if that could be part of her decision-making process, if it could push her toward an affirmative decision. >> it's possible. i think hillary clinton has a lot of things to think over. she has a well-deserved break ahead of her. and what's great about hillary clinton is that whether she decides in the next few months or in a year or in a year and a half, she's going to be a strong candidate regardless. she's going to be able to raise money. she's obviously incredibly well known, polls show she's incredibly well liked. and by contrast, when you look at candidate who is start much later, who don't have that national profile, that late start, they can't ever get off the ground. whether it's rick perry or jon huntsman, they just can't ever get there. so regardless of the timeline, i think clinton is going to be incredibly strong position. >> speaking of who has a national profile, of course, it's not all about hillary
, pollution and safeguard the future. let's bring in democratic strategist and pollster margie o'mara and senior vice president with the winston group, myra miller. good morning. margie, the president wants to focus on what he can do administratively with executive orders although he does plan simultaneously to campaign for public support. very different strategy than he used in his first term, isn't it? >> well, yeah. i think the lesson really here for both obama and for congress is that voters want people to come to the table and find compromise on whatever the issue, whether it's climate change, whether it's reducing gun violence, whether it's jobs or the deficit. voters want to see people coming to the table and you've had a lot of republicans in congress who have had this really failing strategy of just saying no to everything, and it's cost them. it's cost them elections, cost them the presidency, cost them in the senate, and it's cost them support for republican house candidates. >> the president of americans for prosperity which is of course the conservative super pac fou
years ago, margie mcnamara went to a meeting that jacqueline kennedy called a ball cap matt haas says and mrs. kennedy has said too told each house, we are each going to do something to make washington a better place for the people who live and work here every day. mrs. mcnamara had a great reputation as a reading tutor. she tutored the wealthier children in town and she tutored children from very poor economic backgrounds. she had found one day in her tutoring how much it meant to the three boys she was tutoring a local public school to be given a book. she had books that are children had years before that had been left at home of course. she let each of them take a book home. well, one of the mothers came to school the next day to return the stolen boat. i said no, we want to chose to have the book and that started the tradition of when i present a book to a shot of writing the child's name in it. it does not pretend to be the teacher of reading. risk is here to help children, particularly those most at risk of not learning to read well and on time. that usually means poor children.
the focus. sage stands for student achievement guided by experience. joining us is executive director margie weingrow. i love what you do. it's hard to keep kids in college. if they don't have resources or support and your program provides that? >> it does. scholars program works with very low income students, students in poverty. they get to u.c. berkeley where there is over 34,000 students. as you can imagine, fish out of the water there. not only the academic load but the fact this that they have to work while going to school, there is so much going on with them academically dealing with financial aid and all of that not focused on where they need to be when they leave school which is very short period of time. this is real problem at universities now. students are coming into the university and prepared for their academics but not for the professional world. >> there is a lot of stuff, it's more than just staying in school. it's about professional development and personal skills. >> it's much more than that. that is why we see, when we students identify with career that academics go up n
, miss lemon. yes. >> or margaret. that has a lot, too: maggie, madge. >> margot. >> peggy. >> margie, meg, meggie. >> ah, there you are, poirot. i've been looking for you. >> what's your name, chief inspector? >> name? what name? >> your first name. >> james. >> james japp. >> jim. jimmy japp. >> jamie japp. >> chief inspector japp and i will leave you to play. >> what about hercule? >> there aren't any for hercule. >> herc? >> it may be what the murderer has been waiting for, inspector. but we cannot be sure--this is a matter of complex and hidden motives, huh? and-- oh, mon dieu. >> what's up? >> i have been blind. blind! complex, i have said? mais non. simplicity extreme, extreme! and miserable one that i am. i saw nothing! s'il vous plait. >> this makes a nice change for me [indistinct]-- oh, bert, look. we're going to sit next to that nice captain hastings. hello. >> good. that is all, i think, monsieur rice. >> in an ordinary case, the will of a deceased person is read after the funeral. in fact, i am proposing to read it now. although dated last february it only reached me by
washington two democrats margie owe marrow and kirsten powers. have you been listen to the talking points memo. unbelievably brilliant tonight. i'm sure you know that senator rubio comes across as reasonable as well. i think. am i wrong. >> he came across as reasonable. there are a couple things he got wrong. weighs demagoguing a little bit and it was disappointing. one is that the president doesn't believe in the second amendment. i don't think there is any evidence for that. the other was going back to the same demagoguery going on when elm congratulation was last brought up making this claim that people are going to get in front of other people when it was made explicit in the kennedy bill that you would have to go to the back of the line. >> bill: okay, but the kennedy/mccain bill is ancient history. we are talking a new vision now obama never said. >> bill: could be amnesty. >> obama never said that working assumption would be we would be something like we had before and they would work from that. >> bill: kirsten, do you object to anything the senator said? anything that he put fort
knows. >> margie, do you have any problem with this? we're talking about this high-capacity magazine issue too and all kinds of documentation, including mental illness documentation, which i think is so important. the only thing they've left out is why we can't have a little faith, little religion in the schools. even a higher power to teach these kids as they're young kids the difference between right and wrong. now, i don't know if team obama's against religion or not, they probably are in the schools. to me, that's the only thing left out, the rest of the stuff's okay. i don't see a big problem with it. >> i don't see a big problem at all with a lot of these measures. and in fact, most of americans really support all of these measures. there's a huge amount of common ground for a lot of the things we're talking about. universal background checks. currently, about half of gun sales don't require background checks. you can have an order of protection and go find an unlicensed dealer and buy a gun. that happens now against a domestic violence dispute. so that's something that would b
for four days. how do you explain that? - we both know what margie's like. remember three years ago? she ran off to reno with the accordion player. - excuse me. - yeah, i'll be right with you. unless it's an emergency. - no. - good, good. because frankly i wouldn't know what to do if it was. - well, why didn't she ask me to bring in her mail? she always asks me to bring in her mail. - because maybe she left in a hurry. maybe she got swept off her feet. this is marge we're talking about. - can't you go in and look around. - i don't have any cause, dolly. it's only been four days. - come on, i will bet you a slice of your award-winning pecan pie that next week she shows up with a new boyfriend or a new tattoo or both. it is gonna work itself out, i promise. it always does. [sighs] everybody's business is everybody else's business. that's why we live here, i guess. so, how can i help you, mister, um... - monk. adrian monk. - mr. monk. - i was at a wedding last night in montville with my assistant. and we were driving home and the car broke down. it was about a mile north of here. there was
amongous -- humongous margi margin voted. >> and we've already seen reactions in markets in asia. >> yes, the hong kong market is up right now. number one, while we were fighting about whether people who earn more than $400,000 should see a 4.6% increase in their income, everybody loses 2% on your next paycheck. there was the payroll tax holiday. i don't hear anybody -- i didn't hear anybody, republicans or democrats, fighting for the average american who is going to see 2% less in their check. number two, the s&p 500, many of you will have a 401(k) that looks like the s&p 500, particularly if you're lazy and don't mix it up, it was up 15%. it closed the year up 13.4% because of this nonsense. so they cost you. if you have $100,000 saved up, it cost you a few thousand bucks that now won't multiply over the next 15, 20 years you work. this has cost americans a lot of money because of this. >> let's go to dana bash. what are you hearing? >> you can probably see people walking by. just a second ago the house speaker walked from his office, which is right down the hall here to the house floo
direction and i think he needs to hire new people, they knead to hire new people. it's a joke. >> margie, the nra's whole messaging on this, and first of all, i was stunned they'd decided to speak. these whole big gun things, they've always stuck their head in the sand and over time, it will pass. they chose not to, which made you think, huh, this one is different, but how they responded, i can't figure out the political strategy. >> they're calling attention to the fact of what we've known to be true for a while, that the nra leadership does not share the view of gun owners or americans. gun owners and nra members want to keep guns out of dangerous hands. and when the nra acts like they have with these press conferences and then that horrible ad, which clearly had no women at the table when they were making it, they weren't thing about aiming it toward women, they weren't thinking about bringing swing voters or anybody, really, into the fold, no wonder that polls show that their favorability is dropping. it's a problem for them. >> and david, they've not, sure how to respond. they've ac
months. >> and that's not necessarily what we're seeing in investor behavior right now, margie. the same question for you. is this justified given the fact that we are headed into the next couple of months where things will get tougher? we know that we're garnishing defense cuts coming. we know that the fourth quarter was weak because everybody was in lockdown moved. do you want to lighten up on stocks, or not? >> may have a few little bumps in the road. frankically i welcome government spending cuts. i think that would be very positive long term. when you look at way from the government and look at what companies are doing, company results. global competitiveness, hard to get discouraged especially when they are cash flow yields. the opposite of the pes are really better than what you would get in the bond market with the 7% earnings yield. you don't have to think long to know that that's the place to real put your money. >> rick santelli, how do you think this plays out? >> i think belt-tightening is good. we can't artificially try to get rid of all of the hiccups. the recessions and t
. are the alternatives today? margie, what do you think? >> well, i think this is a year that the equities are going to continue to do better that be fixed income. i think we hit the influxion point late in 2012. year-to-date equities are outperforming fixed income, all categories. i think that's the trend. i think it will be equities for the next few years. >> rick santelli, that's what we've been seeing money coming out of fixed income. is this trade
. joining us, margie battle, wells fargo advantage funds senior portfolio manager. earnings are low but doesn't bode well for what we'll hear out of these companies, does it? >> well i think some companies have done some preannouncements where they're expecting their growth to slow down because we should have some pretty low gdp growth for the next several months because of all the uncertainty. however, most companies have high cash flow and i wouldn't be surprised to see some companies actually have some strength to say their growth might pick up either selectively or as they go further through the year. with expectations so low i think that might be enough to set a base to have stocks move higher especially when treasurys are anchored so near zero. tracy: all they have to say is the outlook stablized. doesn't have to say it is getting better, right? they have to say it is on status quo and that is good enough for the market to run. >> i think so. when you look at stocks in general the cash flow is so high, so far above the yields of treasurys, even competitive with high yield bond
a senate hearing? let's bring in ron bongene and margie o'meara. great to see both of you. it seems like both sides of the aisle agree that senator hagel can get a fair hearing but why is he best choice from democrats point of view? >> i think it's a strong choice from a really united american point of view. he earned two purple hearts. he is a republican senator who has not been part of the partisan bickering that people have grown to hate here. he has been endorsed by five former ambassadors to israel. he voted for $40 billion in aid to israel. he has been endorsed by four former security advisors and all those folks that have been appointed by republican and democratic administrations. i think he is strong pick and it would make sense for people to come together and confirm. >> jamie: do you think he was the president's first choice? >> i think certainly he has been a key pick. he has been somebody the president has been working with closely and think he has had a real relationship with. >> he has been an advisor but questions keep coming up on positions on israel which is so critical
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)